English Dictionary in csv format

I was working on a project on an English Dictionary for Scilab where I made use of a dictionary in a csv file.

english dictionary excel file text file csv

I got the word meanings from OPTED(The Online Plain Text English Dictionary), which is based on “The Project Gutenberg Etext of Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary” which is in turn based on the 1913 US Webster’s Unabridged Dictionary (See Project Gutenburg), as a text file.

I then converted the text files into csv. I am sharing those here if anyone needs them.

Just don’t forget to thank me in the comments section below.

[EDIT: Notmi Namae made a generous contribution by compiling all the words in a singe CSV with the title, type and meaning in different cells. You can download it: dictionary.csv]

Dictionary in csv:

Z Y X W V U T S R Q P O N M L K J I H G F E D C B A

Words in Csv:

Aword Bword Cword Dword Eword Fword Gword Hword Iword Jword Kword Lword Mword Nword Oword Pword Qword Rword Sword Tword Uword Vword Wword Xword Yword Zword

Download all of them in a zip file:

Word lists in csv.zip

Dictionary in csv.zip

Hope you find it useful!

Acknowledgement:

OPTED(The Online Plain Text English Dictionary)

 

 

PhD researcher at Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Germany. I'm a physicist specializing in theoretical, computational and experimental condensed matter physics. I like to develop Physics related apps and softwares from time to time. Can code in most of the popular languages. Like to share my knowledge in Physics and applications using this Blog and a YouTube channel.
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57 thoughts on “English Dictionary in csv format

  1. its not very useful if the word is in the same cell as the definition. And i think most systems could handle all 26 letters in one file

    1. Well you can easily separate the words from the meanings by little programming.. I mean you could use a code that would find the first occurrence of this ‘)’ and then copy everything after it to a different file.
      I preferred to have the words and the meanings together cause I wanted to display the whole thing.
      Again a little programming can be used to concatenate(append) all the files together. However I didnt do that to save processing time. Cause I could just have a look at the first letter and know the file that I need to look for the word in thereby saving me some time. I f you have all the words in the same file and the user enters a word startin
      g from ‘z’ then you would have to unnecessarily go through almost all the words in the file, thereby wasting a lot of time.

  2. Hi dear Sharma
    I am Manoochehr Karimi , English Language Teacher, from Iran.
    I need the audio files of each English words in mp3.
    Would you mind helping me how to get them?
    Thanks a million
    email: [email protected]

  3. You are awesome. Thanks for sharing. Can’t believe some are complaining, lol. Saved me a bunch of time! 🙂

  4. How is this more practical than the original OPTED dictionary?
    You just removed the structure and added random linebreaks and quotation marks so that it cannot be reused as easily. CSV is there to have multiple cells in different lines and not to take the whole line and put it into a single cell, so why didn’t you just utilize this?

    1. For one thing, the software that I was working with could only read a csv. So basically yeah its just a txt converted to a csv.
      I take it that you want the word to be in a different column and the meaning in another.
      Well, I didn’t need that as I already explained in a previous comment.

      1. Okay, I understand.
        I downloaded the dictionary from the original page myself now and formatted it into a single file (including a-z) with UTF-8 encoding and separate columns of the form:
        “word”,”type”,”description”

        If anyone needs it, I put it onto my google drive:
        https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByLZAhdz2XrhdTMtZ0hRaExZUkE

        (PS: If you want to, you can also add it to your blog above as download)

        1. Just found this. Strong work. The file Notmi created, at least the version posted here, only has b words through badger. I didn’t look further — there may be other missing words.

  5. This is a poet’s dream. I couldn’t find anything like this until now. It’s been years. The find function is a journey.

  6. THANK YOU SO MUCH! I was looking for this! I’m making a java project based on Scrabble board game. I’ll be sure to reference your name and website. You’re awesome man! 🙂

  7. Thank you for the wonderful work. It is much useful if it has pronunciations as well. Is there any way for you to include them

  8. Thanx brother great hard work done by you to make our work easy. i was looking for the same.
    Thanx Once again Great Job.

  9. This is not a CSV file. It’s just a test dump of dictionary data containing non standard test which kinda resembles a dictionary. CSV means “Comma Separated Values” .
    You should not use the acronym CSV. Did you even research what a CSV file was before pretending to make one. It should not be published with the CSV extension because it is not a CSV text data-file.

    It hinders real work because it useless as a CSV file. People should study the subject matter before committing a claimed general work. Yes it can be converted to CSV. but that dosent make it a CSV file. call it .dat or something other than CSV. Why ? CSV is a standard file format with specific defined formatting rules.

    1. Each line of a .CSV file is considered as a data-entry/record.
      Which is what the files provide.

      Also, as mentioned in the post above, here is the link to the comma separated words and meanings: https://www.bragitoff.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/dictionary.csv

      Moreover, I am not sure how it cost you more time? It literally gives you the word meanings in each line, and not only that it gives the list of words separately as well. Just feed it into http://www.delim.co and generate an array from the .csv file.

      As I explained in another comment: ”

      Well you can easily separate the words from the meanings by little programming.. I mean you could use a code that would find the first occurrence of this ‘)’ and then copy everything after it to a different file.
      I preferred to have the words and the meanings together cause I wanted to display the whole thing.
      Again a little programming can be used to concatenate(append) all the files together. However I didnt do that to save processing time. Cause I could just have a look at the first letter and know the file that I need to look for the word in thereby saving me some time. I f you have all the words in the same file and the user enters a word startin
      g from ‘z’ then you would have to unnecessarily go through almost all the words in the file, thereby wasting a lot of time.

  10. I wasted allot of time trying to figure out this junk. I’m sorry I’m not trying to be rude, but It’s very incomplete and full of errors. You should have kept it to yourself and the few people who needed this kind of incomplete data-set. It cost me time. There is already to much incomplete error riddled work published on the internet .

    1. Well, as you can see at least 40 plus comments are expressing their gratitude for it. So, it wasn’t really useless.

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